Center awarded $90,000 grant

BMS grant
From back left: Kevin Basmadjian, interim dean of the Quinnipiac University School of Education; Nicolas Carrasco, assistant professor of biochemistry; Richard Therrien, K-12 science supervisor for the New Haven Public Schools; Laurie Moreno, K-12 science and technology resource for the Wallingford Public Schools; Pat Frisketti, director of science for the Hamden Public Schools; Lois Lehman, director of curriculum and professional development for the Meriden Public Schools; Harry Pylypiw, professor of chemistry; and Alex Hodges, assistant professor of physics. Front row starting on left: Lucie Howell, director of the Bristol-Myers Squibb Center for Science Teaching and Learning; Patricia White, North Haven District science program coordinator; and Sarah Berke, assistant professor of biology.

March 19, 2013 -The Bristol-Myers Squibb Center for Science Teaching and Learning at Quinnipiac University has been awarded nearly $90,000 to develop K-12 science education.

The $89,109 award, presented under the federal 2013 Teacher Quality Partnership Grant Program, Office of Higher Education, supports the project titled "Online Resources through Integrated STEM [Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics]."

"One of the best ways we can connect with young people about STEM and STEM-focused careers is through our teachers," said Lucie Howell, director of the Bristol-Myers Squibb Center for Science Teaching and Learning. "We need to equip our students with best-practice techniques and engage them in the process while connecting them with a team that demonstrates what is possible in the classroom."

The project will be directed by Howell, Kevin Basmadjian, interim dean of the School of Education, and Richard Therrien, New Haven K-12 science supervisor.

"We are hoping to create the foundation of an online resource that has the potential to grow and become more than a resource," Howell said. "Even if they are not interested in pursuing a career in say microbiology, they will still need to have an understanding of microorganisms because it helps them to live and lead healthier lives."

One of the central goals of the School of Education is to serve as a hub of professional development activities for teachers and leaders in the greater New Haven community, Basmadjian said. 

"Obtaining grants such as the Teacher Quality Partnership with the Bristol-Myers Squibb Center is one pathway to achieving this goal," he said. "We look forward to working with the BMS Center on this very important project."

Five members of the College of Arts and Sciences faculty will develop units that utilize basic engineering design process and project-based and science-inquiry learning with science teachers from Hamden, Meriden, New Haven, North Haven and Wallingford. Among the faculty: Sarah Berke, assistant professor of biology; Nicolas Carrasco, assistant professor of biochemistry; Alex Hodges, assistant professor of physics; Courtney McGinnis, assistant professor of biology; and Harry Pylypiw, professor of chemistry

The project evaluation will be led by Eric Conrad, an adjunct professor in the School of Education, in partnership with Bonnie Maur, of Maur and Associates.