Quinnipiac makes a voluntary payment of $400,000 to North Haven

Quinnipiac University President John L. Lahey and North Haven First Selectman Michael J. Freda
From left: Quinnipiac University President John L. Lahey presents a voluntary payment of $400,000 to North Haven First Selectman Michael J. Freda.

Feb. 1, 2016 - Quinnipiac made a voluntary payment of $400,000 to the town of North Haven Feb. 1 during a ceremony at the North Haven Town Hall. 

The voluntary payment represents 40 percent or $260,000 of the revenue North Haven receives from the state of Connecticut's Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILOT) and Pequot Fund allocation, attributable to Quinnipiac. In addition, Quinnipiac will give another $140,000 that will be used for outdoor lighting for the North Haven girls' softball program. 

Quinnipiac University President John L. Lahey said, "This voluntary payment represents an affirmation of the University's ongoing support and appreciation for all that North Haven does for Quinnipiac. The University's presence in North Haven has grown considerably since 2007, when we purchased the former Anthem Blue Cross & Blue Shield campus. Today, five (Medicine, Law, Health Sciences, Nursing and Education) of our eight schools and our information services department are located on the North Haven Campus. We truly appreciate how the leadership of the town of North Haven has supported Quinnipiac as the University has invested more than $300 million in constructing the North Haven Campus."  

North Haven First Selectman Michael J. Freda said, "The University's contributions to the town of North Haven, together with its contributions to the economy, truly make Quinnipiac an important and engaged partner within our local community. Quinnipiac University, with its excellent educational programs and striking campus, is well positioned to be considered an important asset to the town of North Haven. 

"Quinnipiac continues to demonstrate an interest in the concerns and welfare of our community through its concerted and ongoing efforts to give back to the town," Freda added. "This healthy relationship is dependent on maintaining an open line of communication between our town officials and the University. This communication allows for a strengthening of personal alliances and keeps our offices current on emerging plans and objectives." 

Freda also credited Quinnipiac with placing value on the relations with municipal authorities. "Quinnipiac has taken particular care to maintain the trust and goodwill of its immediate neighbors who are most impacted by University activities," he said. 

More than 3,000 students take classes on Quinnipiac's North Haven Campus. The university employs 373 faculty and staff members on its North Haven Campus.