2014 Symposium Speakers

roman
Joe Roman

Keynote Speaker - Joe Roman
Joe Roman is a conservation biologist and researcher at the Gund Institute for Ecological Economics at the University of Vermont and a Hrdy Visiting Fellow at Harvard University. His research, focusing on endangered species conservation and marine ecology, has appeared in Science, Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, Trends in Ecology and Evolution, and many other journals. Roman is the author of Whale and Listed: Dispatches from America's Endangered Species Act, winner of the Rachel Carson Environment Book Award in 2012. He has written for Audubon, New Scientist, The New York Times, Slate, and other publications.

Roman is the recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship in Brazil to research invertebrate conservation and a McCurdy Fellowship at the Duke University Marine Lab to examine the ecological role of whales in the oceans. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 2003 in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and his master's degree in Wildlife Ecology and Conservation from the University of Florida. Born and raised in New York, Roman considers King Kong as an early conservation influence.

Daniels
Marta Daniels
Photo credit: Jeff Todd Titon

Marta Daniels
Marta Daniels is a writer, activist and public historian. In her 35-year professional career she devoted herself to expanding and improving civic engagement in public policy issues on peace, justice and the environment. She was the executive director and project director for half a dozen national organizations and educational programs including OPTIONS: A University Outreach Program on International Security based at Brown University; the National Endowment for the Humanities' Choices Library Project that took place in 37 states; and the Connecticut Humanities Council's Seminars in the Professions. She is the author of several books, dozens of research papers and hundreds of articles.

In retirement, Daniels' interest in northern slavery and early American history led to her co-discovery in 2009 of a missing tract of land purchased in 1770 by famous freed black slave Venture Smith. Lost for more than 200 years, the land's location on Barn Island in Stonington, Conn., was found and verified using land record research, digital mapping of old deeds with correction for magnetic drift, and on-site field surveying. Its discovery was recorded by C-Span, and the site will now be added to the Connecticut Freedom Trail. In 2011, that same interest in northern slavery led to Daniels' research on Connecticut's past ivory trade, its impact on black Africans, and the understanding that Connecticut's 100-year role as the largest importer of ivory in the world to make piano keys also meant that the state was complicit in the largest slaughter of elephants and the greatest enslavement of Africans to haul their tusks. While unable to change the past, Daniels joined with others locally to change the future and stop today's illicit ivory trafficking and all elephant killing. Those citizen efforts led to the recent National Public Radio story, and accompanying press release by the Deep River Historical Society, about Deep River and Essex, and the plight of elephants today, "Elephant Slaughter, African Slavery And America's Pianos," heard by more than 14 million listeners.

Harris
Michael Harris

Michael Harris
Michael Harris is the wildlife law program director for the animal rights advocacy organization Friends of Animals. For nearly two decades, he has worked as an environmental attorney, much of the time working directly on litigation to protect wildlife and natural ecosystems. Harris received a BA in environmental and political studies from Pitzer College in Claremont, California, a MSL from Vermont Law School, and a JD from the University of California-Berkeley, where he was an executive editor for the Ecology Law Quarterly. Before his position at Friends of Animals, Harris was an associate professor at the University of Denver, where he directed the school's Environmental Law Clinic.



Jeffrey Hostetler
Jeffrey Hostetler

Jeffrey Hostetler
Jeffrey Hostetler is a Midwesterner by birth, an engineer by temperament and training, and a local history hobbyist. He graduated from Purdue University. He is retired from a career as a research metallurgist at Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Division of United Technologies, and has been an engaged resident of Deep River, Conn. for more than forty years.








revkin
Andrew Revkin
Photo courtesy of Daniel Revkin

Andrew Revkin
Andrew Revkin has been writing about environmental sustainability for more than three decades, from the Amazon to the White House to the North Pole, mainly for The New York Times. He has won the top awards in science journalism multiple times, along with a Guggenheim Fellowship.

As the Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding at Pace University, he teaches courses in blogging, environmental communication and documentary film. He has written acclaimed books on global warming, the changing Arctic and the assault on the Amazon rain forest, as well as three book chapters on science communication. Drawing on his experience with his Times blog, Dot Earth, which Time Magazine named one of the top 25 blogs in 2013, Revkin speaks to audiences around the world about the power of the Web to foster progress. 



Roberts
Adam M. Roberts
Photo courtesy of Tom Williams

Adam M. Roberts
Adam M. Roberts, based in Washington D.C., is the CEO of Born Free USA and acting CEO of the Born Free Foundation in the UK. Prior, he was executive vice president at Born Free, a role he held since helping launch the organization in 2002 to bring the UK-based Born Free Foundation's message of compassionate conservation to the American public. Roberts has significant expertise and more than two decades of experience in the international wildlife trade and captive wild animals. He also serves on the board of directors of the Species Survival Network and is a founding member of the board and current chairman of the board of Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries. He is based in Washington D.C.






Tischler
Joyce Tischler

Joyce Tischler
As one of the co-founders of the Animal Legal Defense Fund in 1979, California attorney Joyce Tischler has helped shape the emerging field of animal law. Tischler litigated some of the Animal Legal Defense Fund's earliest cases, including a 1981 lawsuit that halted the U.S. Navy's plan to kill 5,000 feral burros, and a 1988 challenge to the U.S. Patent Office's rule allowing the patenting of genetically altered animals. Tischler has lectured extensively in the U.S. and abroad, teaches a fundamentals of animal law course, developed the first-ever farmed animal law and policy class, and is currently co-authoring two books related to animal law issues. Her law review articles include: The History of Animal Law, Part II (1985-2011), 5 Stan. J. Animal L. & Pol'y 27 (2012), and The History of Animal Law, Part I (1972-1987), 1 Stan. J. Animal L. & Pol'y 1 (2008). She has been quoted in top media outlets, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Christian Science Monitor, Science Magazine and People Magazine. Tischler is a Recipient of the American Bar Association TIPS Animal Law Committee's Excellence in the Advancement of Animal Law Award. She was the Animal Legal Defense Fund's Executive Director for 25 years and now serves as the agency's general counsel.

Additional speakers will be announced as they are confirmed.

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